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BillW
06-26-2007, 10:44 AM
It looks like you have designed gearbox/motor combinations for battlebots - where you don't need high rpms so it's appropriate to gear them down. I'm thinking of an application where I'd like the high RPM of the original motor. (listed as "Replacement Motors at http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/c/3086-BaneBots.aspx) I'm thinking of building a blower with a model airplane prop on the shaft of one of these motors.

So, the questions:

Are these motors connected directly to the controller? (i.e. the gearbox doesn't contain any important electronics)
The motor will be in the airstream so it will have a lot of cooling but, even in those conditions, how do you think the motor would do under continuous duty? You have some heat sinks which may be helpful too.
I'm not sure which motor I would need but I'd think it would need to be as strong as possible. Also, I'd like to control the speed of this motor from a C# application via USB. Considering all I've said, which motor and controller would you recommend?
Thanks, :o
Bill

Dave
06-27-2007, 08:56 AM
Are these motors connected directly to the controller? (i.e. the gearbox doesn't contain any important electronics)
A dc motor controller will drive the bare motors just fine. The gearbox isn't anything special. Just gears.


The motor will be in the airstream so it will have a lot of cooling but, even in those conditions, how do you think the motor would do under continuous duty? You have some heat sinks which may be helpful too.
I don't have any solid motor lifespan numbers for you, but I can say that heat shouldn't be much of an issue in your design if you use a heat sink.


I'm not sure which motor I would need but I'd think it would need to be as strong as possible.
Keep in mind that these are inexpensive hobby motors. The bare motors have low torque and high speed when no gearbox is used.

Knowing your size, voltage, and current constraints would make this decision easier. What will you be using as a power source?


Also, I'd like to control the speed of this motor from a C# application via USB. Considering all I've said, which motor and controller would you recommend?
I would recommend using one of the Phidgets USB servo controllers to generate the R/C control signal, which you could then connect to a dc motor controller. I'll hold off on recommending a motor controller until we've decided what motor you need.

BillW
06-27-2007, 11:11 AM
Thanks Dave,

The problem I have is that I'm not sure what kind of load it's gonna take. Perhaps it's just best, for now, to experiment. I happen to have pilfered a DC motor from an old printer that I could use. It's this one:

http://www.mabuchi-motor.co.jp/cgi-bin/catalog/e_catalog.cgi?CAT_ID=rs_545ph

Which possibly is the same as your motor:

http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5146-RS-545-Motor-12V.aspx

If I get the larger DC motor controller:

http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/4267-BaneBots-Motor-Controller-45A-peak-.aspx

then can up/downsize the motor as necessary, right?

Considering what I've told you, what would you recommend for a power supply?

I'm already looking at getting the Phidget 4 Motor Servo controller, by the way.

Cheers,
Bill

Dave
06-29-2007, 03:12 PM
That certainly looks like the same motor, though their voltage and current specs are way off from what I've got. Anyhow, you can use the 45A BaneBots controller with smaller motors. There's usually no such thing as overkill when it comes to dc motor controllers. As for the power supply, I'd recommend a 12V battery or AC adapter.