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Linda
01-26-2008, 01:11 PM
OK, my niece called last week and asked for help on a science project where she had to build a car to go around obstacles. I started looking up websites and one thing led to another and I found that youtube bioloid humvee transformer and I really want one of those. That's just too cool.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zK8OjwMdn5I


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zK8OjwMdn5I

I think I can do it. I'm an electrical engineer and I've tinkered with fixing/modifying electronic games for years. How hard do you think it is to make one of those Humvees? Has anyone here made one or something similar? I'd hate spend $1000 on a Bioloid comprehensive kit and the extras just to find out I bit off more than I can chew. Are there any cheaper kits that can do the same thing? Any out of the box humanoid robots that can bend over and roll? I'm so new to this it's embarrassing to ask questions.

Any help/insights you can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Linda

Alex
01-26-2008, 04:16 PM
Hey Linda, welcome:)

The bioloid kit is the only kit that I can am aware of that has the ability to fold onto itself like you would need. There are other kits such as the Robonova that can bend over and roll, but I don't think it would be possible to mod one out to a hummer transformer. It's definitely an ambitious project, but if you are able to finish it, be sure to enter it in the contest (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/contest.aspx). I'm sure everyone here will help you out a lot on it!

asbrandsson
01-26-2008, 11:36 PM
Hello,

I think that it is a good project, that would be good to do with a Bioloid Kit. However, if you are good with Autocad, you could probably make it cheaper by getting the parts CNC out of aircraft Aluminum and buying the servos and a servo controller. I all comes down to how much money you want to spend to get the end result that you want.

Asbrandsson

Linda
01-27-2008, 01:14 AM
I'm not so much worried about the cost as long as I'm happy with the result. I do care about my time though. I'm spread a bit thin already. I would have loved to buy that Humvee transformer from the owner and just made small tweaks and modifications to it. Anyone one want to make one for a small fee plus materials? :happy: It may come to that after I start playing around with this stuff. I hope not, this sounds like fun project.

Regards,
Linda

DresnerRobotics
01-27-2008, 10:25 AM
If you're an electrical engineer you've probably got a bit of an iron thumb anyway, meaning that you're probably ahead of your average joe as far as building things or putting things together. The Bioloid kits are basically, a robotic lego (or erector) set. All the pieces are modular, they're meant to attach together very easily... really it shouldn't be an issue for you to build something similar to the humvee. It might take a month or so (less if you have solid blocks of hours to get things done, I wish I did haha) to get it built and learn their sequencing program, but I don't think it's out of reach for any engineer by any means, let alone average hobbyist.

kdwyer
01-28-2008, 09:57 AM
Agreed, tres cool. I would think some of the better humanoid frames could be modified without losing sanity. Definitely be a bit of work getting it all packed in properly.
An accomplishment worthy of praise, and a secure straightjacket. (In that order.)

srobot
01-28-2008, 11:05 AM
Q - How long did it take?

A -Thank you for interest in my robot. How long? Um... Actually, I used up all of my summer vacation but it was worth consuming.

I love this robot too, I have the second comment on this video : )

--Scotty

Dave
01-28-2008, 12:15 PM
Q - How long did it take?

A -Thank you for interest in my robot. How long? Um... Actually, I used up all of my summer vacation but it was worth consuming.

I love this robot too, I have the second comment on this video : )

--Scotty

Um... Just to clarify... You did not make the hummer transformer robot, right? Your post is kind of confusing.

Dave
01-28-2008, 01:33 PM
I want to address this bit first:

I'm so new to this it's embarrassing to ask questions.
Never be embarrassed to ask questions. We all have to start somewhere. :)


I think I can do it. I'm an electrical engineer and I've tinkered with fixing/modifying electronic games for years. How hard do you think it is to make one of those Humvees? Has anyone here made one or something similar?

I've never seen another project like this, but I don't think it would be too tough. I think the hardest part might be finding the right toy truck to hack apart.


I'd hate spend $1000 on a Bioloid comprehensive kit and the extras just to find out I bit off more than I can chew.

If you can wield a screwdriver, you should have no problem. I built the Bioloid humanoid in about 7 hours. Programming is pretty easy, too. Servo positions are set using a pose-and-capture system. You can move some servos, capture the positions, then lock those servos while you move others around, and finally fine-tune the positions through the software interface. The behavior programs are laid out using a graphical interface, kind of like a branching flowchart.


Are there any cheaper kits that can do the same thing? Any out of the box humanoid robots that can bend over and roll?

Not that I'm aware of. Bioloid is the best for this for a couple of reasons. First, the same actuators can be used as servos and as continuous-turn motors. This is convenient because it allows you to use the same brackets to mount both servos and motors. Another thing that helped make this transforming design possible is the wide rotation range (300 degrees) of the servos.

srobot
01-28-2008, 02:31 PM
Um... Just to clarify... You did not make the hummer transformer robot, right? Your post is kind of confusing.

Oops! I though I made it clear.

I did NOT make the robot... Whish I did though!

(I found the answer in the comments area on YouTube)

Latter,
--Scotty

srobot
01-28-2008, 02:35 PM
Not that I'm aware of. Bioloid is the best for this for a couple of reasons. First, the same actuators can be used as servos and as continuous-turn motors. This is convenient because it allows you to use the same brackets to mount both servos and motors. Another thing that helped make this transforming design possible is the wide rotation range (300 degrees) of the servos.

To say nothing about the needed torque for this project... The Bioloid has more torque over the RoboNova-1 and KHR robots.

Linda
02-01-2008, 09:26 PM
Well I have placed my order for the Bioloid comprehensive kit. I can't wait until it arrives. I'll keep you guys informed on my progress.


Linda

srobot
02-01-2008, 10:57 PM
Well I have placed my order for the Bioloid comprehensive kit. I can't wait until it arrives. I'll keep you guys informed on my progress.


Linda

Very good choice!

To save yourself money you may want to buy some type of wire protection. (http://ribolabs.wordpress.com/2008/02/01/robotic-wire-protection/)

Cheers.

Alex
02-01-2008, 11:21 PM
To save yourself money you may want to buy some type of wire protection. (http://ribolabs.wordpress.com/2008/02/01/robotic-wire-protection/)

Thanks for that link Scotty! That's some great advice.

We've only taken our Bioloid kit out a few times (trying to build a store for all of ya;)), but when we did I noticed there was quite a bit of pinching/rubbing with the wires around the joints. I've been forgetting to ask everyone what they do to prevent the wires from wearing, so thanks!

Be sure to keep us updated with how well that non-fray sleeving works.

srobot
02-02-2008, 08:33 AM
Be sure to keep us updated with how well that non-fray sleeving works.

I will!

I ordered it in 1/8" and 1/4" sizes, and 1' long each, to find what size works best before buying 16 feet of this for William (my Bioloid).

I think it was $0.55 USD per foot of the 1/8" stuff, and $0.75 per foot of the 1/4" tube. If you buy more than 100 feet you will get it cheaper.

--Scotty

kdwyer
02-02-2008, 05:39 PM
It might not be exactly what you're looking for, but split loom corrugated tubing, available at (among others) www.AllElectronics.com (http://www.AllElectronics.com) will protect wires from rubbing brackets or chassis parts. (And look cool.)
As for general flexing, ya got me there. A high-strand count wire will be more flexible than a lower count, and solid wire is a problem looking for a place to occur (as regards bending.)
Wide arcs can reduce the amount of flex. To me, this leads to unsightly loops at hinges etc. The solution? Be prepared to splice in wires where alot of bending or flexure occurs. This is one of those intractable problems that will make someone alot of money if they figure a way out.

Alex
02-04-2008, 09:27 AM
Well I have placed my order for the Bioloid comprehensive kit. I can't wait until it arrives. I'll keep you guys informed on my progress.definitely keep us posted Linda! I'd love to see a community member repeat this project:D This is a perfect project to document in your blog (http://forums.trossenrobotics.com/blog.php) here in the community too!

If you run into any questions at all, let us know! There's quite a few people here with Bioloid kits.