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Droid Works
04-29-2008, 10:24 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-Qu5TSzv-4
R-Blue10 ver-a

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 10:32 AM
Here is one of him jumping

http://www.truveo.com/RBlue10-%E3%81%86%E3%81%97%E3%82%8D%E3%81%86%E3%81%95%E3%8 1%8E%E8%B7%B3%E3%81%B3/id/3770941685

Matt
04-29-2008, 11:43 AM
Wow, I can't imagine what kind of insane force the motor shafts in his knees are taking when he lands.

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 11:56 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0N49_SL3CK8

here is another one. Man would I like to have a set of those servos.

LinuxGuy
04-29-2008, 11:58 AM
here is another one. Man would I like to have a set of those servos.
I'm impressed, but not as impressed as I would be if it were an SES built biped doing that.

8-Dale

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 02:19 PM
I know they sell these at Robot Kingdom in japan. Anyone know if the R-Blue series robots will be available in the US eventually?

Alex
04-29-2008, 04:03 PM
Did I miss something? What kind of servos are these beasts using?

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 04:28 PM
We don't know but they look like they can really take a beating from the jumping video. Thats what I want to know so I can buy some...lol


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7NgZz6mIKw

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 04:43 PM
These are just 2 cool. I want one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaQ9DruDoyk

asbrandsson
04-29-2008, 06:32 PM
Hello,

That is a cool robot - I hope that that plateform becomes available to the world soon.

Asbrandsson

Wingzero01w
04-29-2008, 07:08 PM
Wow thats an awesome robot. I think the servos for the hip (back) might be dynamixels and the rest could possibly be futubas or possibly a 5990TG

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 07:11 PM
I think they are model specific servos or new Honda servos.

Alex
04-29-2008, 08:19 PM
Honda servos?

Droid Works
04-29-2008, 08:43 PM
I have a friend in japan that told me honda is going to start making servos. 2 of the blue series robots are called honda and yonda. I wonder if maybe thats who makes it. Just a guess but 1 thing is for sure they cant be off the shelf servos.

Wingzero01w
04-29-2008, 08:46 PM
If Honda would start making servos, would it be for themselves and high research facilities or to the general public? I'd imagine they'd be pretty nice servos since there comming from Honda.

LinuxGuy
04-29-2008, 09:12 PM
If Honda would start making servos, would it be for themselves and high research facilities or to the general public? I'd imagine they'd be pretty nice servos since there comming from Honda.
Making your own servos is definitely one way to make sure your robots have the power they require for cool moves.

8-Dale

Wingzero01w
04-29-2008, 09:57 PM
Making your own servos is definitely one way to make sure your robots have the power they require for cool moves.

8-Dale

Very true, i plan on making my own servo one day. But i cant think of that when i have other projects to think about :). Im now trying to figuer out how to make my own control boards for my robots but... learning to program is a pain/boring :()

Alex
04-30-2008, 09:04 AM
If Honda would start making servos, would it be for themselves and high research facilities or to the general public? I'd imagine they'd be pretty nice servos since there comming from Honda.I'd imagine that they'd keep them all to themselves and research facilities, but who knows;)



learning to program is a pain/boringIt can be a bit tedious at times, I can definitely agree with that. The important thing is to never let the learning experience of programming become a "burden" or daunting task. If you're getting burned out on it, take a few weeks off and try something else. If you're anything like me the last thing you want to be is too burned out on something because once I become too burned out, even if I totally love the topic at hand at first, I don't have any desire to go back and try it again (like eating meatloaf:D).

Wingzero01w
04-30-2008, 10:00 AM
I'd imagine that they'd keep them all to themselves and research facilities, but who knows;)


It can be a bit tedious at times, I can definitely agree with that. The important thing is to never let the learning experience of programming become a "burden" or daunting task. If you're getting burned out on it, take a few weeks off and try something else. If you're anything like me the last thing you want to be is too burned out on something because once I become too burned out, even if I totally love the topic at hand at first, I don't have any desire to go back and try it again (like eating meatloaf:D).

Going from language to language gets confusing especially when seeing Basic and then looking over at a language like C or Spin for the propellor. I want to do development for the dsPIC or a prop chip but learning their language is hard and thats whats keeping me from buying them.

Adrenalynn
04-30-2008, 11:39 AM
I don't think it's possible to learn a language without having the hardware (or a functional emulator) to learn it on. At some point you either have to make the commitment or find something else to spend time and money on... It seems a lot more daunting than it really is once you dig into it and start solving problems. Baby steps, don't try to take on anything gihugic to start out with. Just set little goals and explore and have fun.

[I started programming in Z80 assembler in 1978, 6502 assembler in 1979. Today, they all just look like "yet another language" to me. ;)]

Alex
04-30-2008, 12:59 PM
Going from language to language gets confusing especially when seeing Basic and then looking over at a language like C or Spin for the propellor. I want to do development for the dsPIC or a prop chip but learning their language is hard and thats whats keeping me from buying them.

True, going from language to language can get confusing. However, the more you do it, the more you get used to it and find similarities between languages. Programming Logic is very similar between a lot of different langauges, it's the Syntax that you need to get used to. As Adrenalynn mentioned, baby steps is the key to learning programming. You don't want to dig yourself too deep into anything that you can't find your way out.

LinuxGuy
04-30-2008, 01:19 PM
True, going from language to language can get confusing. However, the more you do it, the more you get used to it and find similarities between languages. Programming Logic is very similar between a lot of different langauges, it's the Syntax that you need to get used to. As Adrenalynn mentioned, baby steps is the key to learning programming. You don't want to dig yourself too deep into anything that you can't find your way out.
Yes, indeed, and I can echo the baby steps comments too. I get ahead of myself sometimes, and that nearly always gets me into problems. As for programming languages, one task I had to do was convert BASIC code to C, and that always gave me headaches at the end of the day. This is about as wide a gap as you could get in language syntaxes. I rarely worked a full day when I was doing that, and nobody ever complained, because I was the best at doing those conversions. I had to switch contexts several times a day.

8-Dale

tom_chang79
04-30-2008, 03:07 PM
The way I "translate" code from language to language is just understand the algorithm and the program flow and the data structures, and implement those with syntax of the other...

It's true that languages only differ only in syntax, but before choosing any language, one must consider what "level" the language sits at. The higher the level a language is, the further away you are from the hardware with layers of abstraction...

For every application, a developer must fully understand what their objectives are in the project. After you fully understand what your objectives are then you can choose which language/level you should develop in.

Please don't misconstrue "High Level" and "Low Level" as a measure of difficulty. A "Low Level" just means "closer to the hardware" and "High Level" means "further from the hardware."

-------------
Back to the topic, the R-Blue10 is a beaut. More choices = more fun....

Alex
04-30-2008, 05:01 PM
Please don't misconstrue "High Level" and "Low Level" as a measure of difficulty. A "Low Level" just means "closer to the hardware" and "High Level" means "further from the hardware."

Man, I wish you were around to say that last week in a different thread, haha! I can't seem to find it now, but that is exactly what I was trying to say:D

SN96
04-30-2008, 05:38 PM
These are just 2 cool. I want one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaQ9DruDoyk


That blue & white one looks very much like one of the early Honda robots.

metaform3d
04-30-2008, 08:34 PM
It's true that languages only differ only in syntax, but before choosing any language, one must consider what "level" the language sits at. The higher the level a language is, the further away you are from the hardware with layers of abstraction...You also need to consider what services you can get from standard libraries. It's true that you can program any application in any general-purpose language, but you might have to write your own file I/O routines if there are no libs for it.

tom_chang79
05-01-2008, 10:08 AM
Well, I was speaking in a general sense. I agree with your library statements, however libraries and such pertain to "higher-level" languages such as C/C++, Java, and etc... They are non-existant if you are coding in assembling or even binary :eek:(shoving op codes into memory)...

Libraries are convenient, but they are only good as the person who wrote them. Many of the libraries out there are highly ineffecient in terms of processor usage, but with processor speed getting faster and faster, it becomes less and less of an issue... :wink:

Adrenalynn
05-09-2008, 01:23 PM
I wouldn't necessarily agree that you don't get libraries in Assembler - at least not modern assemblers.

I can't remember the last time I wrote my own file handling routines. Err - that's untrue. I rewrote the file handlers for version 1.0 of MASM. That said - there's nearly always a macro there for the basic stuff.

Droid Works
05-24-2008, 02:40 PM
YouTube - R-Blue8 (ZGOK)YouTube - ??????????????

Yet another R-blue

Wingzero01w
05-24-2008, 02:46 PM
Wow, looks like it came out of an old gundam series.

Sienna
05-24-2008, 06:21 PM
I want a Cylon for christmas!! Cool looking bot!!

Adrenalynn
05-24-2008, 11:34 PM
Where ya been hiding out, Sienna? We missed you!

Droid Works
06-17-2008, 08:15 PM
I found out who makes them its KONDO!

mdenton
06-19-2008, 06:29 AM
What ever servos they are using, they clearly have force feedback capabilities to add compliance to the legs. The dynamixel servos have this capability, so it could be achieved with them.

Droid Works
06-19-2008, 07:42 AM
They are Kondo servos Kondo KRS4013's and it uses a RBC3 controler. They are made by Yoshimura (R-Blue and designer of the KHR-1 & KHR-2HV). Hopefully Kondo will start selling them.

Wingzero01w
06-19-2008, 12:42 PM
There probably going to be pretty expensive if they do =/