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View Full Version : Questions about Tomy i-SOBOT, whats a good starter?



Electricity
07-03-2008, 02:02 PM
Ok, so after crunching some numbers, pretending I don't have to eat for the next few weeks and such I figure I'll have about $400 for an initial budget to build me a mech. After searching the net, and doing as much research as i can (a lot of this is still way over my head..) I came across the Tomy i-SOBOT (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/tomy-i-sobot.aspx) . It SEEMS like it would be the perfect thing to start with, already a humanoid, with everything a body could want as far as parts, atleast to start.
My question is thus, is it customizable enough to be a consideration? What I mean is, can the brain be upgraded to something more dynamic, rather then following a preset series of commands, is there a way to allow it to be autonomous, or alt east controlled via remote. I.e. forward makes it go forward, hitting button n makes it perform maneuver n, etc etc.
And then theres the physical customization. Can I do stuff to it, relatively easily? Are the brain bits programmable enough to add/subtract things and still be controllable?
If not, whats a good way to start, keeping in mind that I have almost 0 programing experience, and my mechanical experience comes mostly from electro-pneumatics (but thats a different discussion.. *devil grin*), and simple repair/replace.
How do I get started with a budget of ~400 bucks!
Help me please!

-Thanks,
-E

Adrenalynn
07-03-2008, 02:16 PM
I'm not the iSobot expert 'round these parts, but I don't think it would get you too far. Just not enough torque on those servos, and that's really what you're paying for.

Electricity
07-03-2008, 02:25 PM
I'm not the iSobot expert 'round these parts, but I don't think it would get you too far. Just not enough torque on those servos, and that's really what you're paying for.
Yeah, I managed to find a lot more about it, and it doesn't seem like its quite what I'm looking for.
The Bioloids look interesting, I can afford the beginner's kit, and just buy servos one at a time.. For the next few years, heh.

Droid Works
07-03-2008, 02:29 PM
I can tell you for sure you wont be disappointed with the bioloid kits. They are loads of fun, and you will learn allot form them.

A-Bot
07-03-2008, 02:35 PM
Yeah, I managed to find a lot more about it, and it doesn't seem like its quite what I'm looking for.
The Bioloids look interesting, I can afford the beginner's kit, and just buy servos one at a time.. For the next few years, heh.

The iSobot is more of a toy. A nice toy.

The Bioloid Comprehensive Kit is the best value in the hobby robotics space. However, it is getting to be quite common, which I know is not cool with the "got to be different" crowd...

darkback2
07-03-2008, 04:53 PM
I got two isobots for my classroom. They are pretty cool...but won't do any good for this.

I was actually looking things over, and to be honest, I'm going to have a hard time participating in this one...not because of money, but because its going to be damn hard to fit all of the stuff needed on a humanoid or bipedal design. I'm looking at my tripod/quad hybrid, and thinking that isn't big enough.

If money is a problem, consider making a quad from scratch using servos and the lynxmotion erector set parts. That way you can put it together yourself over time, and make sure you have enough room.

Also, the bratt is pretty cheep and bipedal. I have a bunch of parts from one on my tripod.

DB

Electricity
07-03-2008, 07:12 PM
I got two isobots for my classroom. They are pretty cool...but won't do any good for this.

I was actually looking things over, and to be honest, I'm going to have a hard time participating in this one...not because of money, but because its going to be damn hard to fit all of the stuff needed on a humanoid or bipedal design. I'm looking at my tripod/quad hybrid, and thinking that isn't big enough.

If money is a problem, consider making a quad from scratch using servos and the lynxmotion erector set parts. That way you can put it together yourself over time, and make sure you have enough room.

Also, the bratt is pretty cheep and bipedal. I have a bunch of parts from one on my tripod.

DB
I was thinking about doing something like that, but I'd need a control board of some kind wouldn't I? How would I interface with it?

DresnerRobotics
07-03-2008, 07:18 PM
Wireless PS2 controller + Basic Atom Bot Board. The bot board acts as your controller, could even relay the wireless controller buttons to fire your weapons. The Casic code it uses is super easy to learn too.

Pretty sure Jim has a good amount of tutorials up on various control methods of the walkers and BRATs he sells up on his site.

darkback2
07-03-2008, 07:34 PM
I'm using 2 phidget4 controllers and a sony vaio on my tripod. Ofcourse that would be bigtime more than $400. If you have any programming experience you could use a parallax board, or the chip tyberious just suggested.

As for designing the central board, I'm using scrap aluminum from the local junk yard. It cuts really easily, and while I can't weld aluminum yet ( I need a gas setup for my lincoln) You can bend it pretty accurately, and epoxy and bolts work wonders.

DB

dcalkins
07-03-2008, 07:37 PM
I'm using 2 phidget4 controllers and a sony vaio on my tripod. Ofcourse that would be bigtime more than $400. If you have any programming experience you could use a parallax board, or the chip tyberious just suggested.

As for designing the central board, I'm using scrap aluminum from the local junk yard. It cuts really easily, and while I can't weld aluminum yet ( I need a gas setup for my lincoln) You can bend it pretty accurately, and epoxy and bolts work wonders.

To that end, you could just buy the lynxmotion servo and body parts. Cheap, good, and very precise.