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RobotServicesGroup
08-15-2009, 07:53 PM
We recently bought a Bioloid. Check out our review and build report here:

http://www.robotservicesgroup.com/BuildPage15.html

This robot is very popular, but how much did we enjoy building it?

http://robosavvy.com/Builders/RobotServicesGroup/build_322smaller.jpg

darkback2
08-15-2009, 11:18 PM
Thanks for the review,

I actually came to a different conclusion than you with my bioloid...but I can understand given your focus on humanoid robots.

As for the modularity aspect, While it is a compromise of sorts, I think the bioloid kit is fantastic for prototyping. Consider the robot that got the gold medal in Mech Warfare was built in 3 days using a bioloid kit.

Again, thanks for posting such a detailed review. I can't wait to see how the bioloid does on all of the tests you do.

DB

Polbit
08-16-2009, 10:24 AM
Just to clarify, I'm sure you didn't strip anything on the servos - you just pushed in the nuts in the servos. They are plastic on the outside, but there is a nut inside for each. You can either try to use a longer screw to see if you can catch the nut, or unscrew the center screw and take the hone off and push the screw(s) back in...

MikeG
08-17-2009, 08:21 AM
My experience with the Bioloid is much more positive. Imho, RobotServicesGroup did a surface level review of the Bioloid kit. Important features like the Dynamixel communication protocol, Bioloid software, and the high level of community support were left out. I give RobotServicesGroup’s review of the Bioloid two thumbs down.

lnxfergy
08-17-2009, 08:44 AM
Just to clarify, I'm sure you didn't strip anything on the servos - you just pushed in the nuts in the servos. They are plastic on the outside, but there is a nut inside for each. You can either try to use a longer screw to see if you can catch the nut, or unscrew the center screw and take the hone off and push the screw(s) back in...

Yup, I suspect the same thing. What I'll often do is back the center servo horn screw out a little, so I can shove a flat head screwdriver under the side of the horn and push the nut back into the horn. The only nut I've ever truly stripped was definitely my fault: I didn't have the nut fully seated, it was somewhat sideways and I forced the screw into it.

If you did somehow strip out the nut, you can pop the servo horn off and replace the nut, since it just sits inside the molding of the horn on the bottom side.


My experience with the Bioloid is much more positive. Imho, RobotServicesGroup did a surface level review of the Bioloid kit. Important features like the Dynamixel communication protocol, Bioloid software, and the high level of community support were left out. I give RobotServicesGroup’s review of the Bioloid two thumbs down.

My experiance is also much more positive. I think one of the biggest differences is that the Bioloid is intended more as a construction kit or a tool for building robots (think legos), than as a finished humanoid like most other kits that these guys have reviewed. Personally, I felt that the manual had a fine level of detail, but it is definately more like a lego-style manual than a toy assembly manual.

I think rather than viewing this as a full review of the Bioloid, it is more of a comparison against other humanoids. You can tell that right off when they start comparing the Bioloid to the i-Sobot, a comparision I'd probably never make... And of course, my review would be WAY different, because I've never even use the CM-5, just jumped straight into using an AVR to control the servos.

-Fergs

tom_chang79
08-17-2009, 02:10 PM
I thought the review was quite good and thoroughly enjoyed it. Some of the frustrations that RSG faced in building the Bioloid was the same frustrations I faced when building mine.

Regarding the nuts that are shoved into the lobes of the servos/actuators, I managed to strip out the lobes of some of them because when the screws are tightened, the torque from the screw forced the nut to rotate and ended up stripping the soft plastic lobes on the servo/actuator casing.

I think this area could've been beefed up...

My other frustration was attaching the CM-5 unit. That has got to be the most non-sensical way to attach the unit to the torso... First, the screwdriver you use have to be thin enough to go into the "hole" where the screw goes, second, you have to employ the use of those "stickers" that came with the kit to hold the nut in place of those brackets that are attached to the shoulder servos... I really think a better design could've been done to avoid attaching it this way which is less then elegant...

Those are my only gripe. The positives (which far outweighs the negatives) in my opinion:

1) Torque king compared to other humanoids

2) Smart actuators. They're not just servos, they have a MCU inside and temp sensor!!!

3) 18 DOF - Hip rotate! I dislike humanoids that doesn't have hip rotate and have to "shuffle" to turn.

4) "daisy chain" style servo connection - wiring is SOOO much cleaner. Since each actuator is daisy-chained, you don't have this big wad of wires centralized near the controller/servo driver...

5) came with a triple IR and sound sensor (AX-S1). Most humanoids doesn't come with any sensors...

6) $$$ - Biggest bang for your buck in its class. Kondos are great, I think they are beautiful, but they are a bit overpriced for the weak servos that you get with it... Humanoids are all about strong servos. Just look at Tyberius' humanoid and almost all the Robo-One humanoids, torque is the key!!!

billyzelsnack
08-19-2009, 05:13 PM
Yup, I suspect the same thing. What I'll often do is back the center servo horn screw out a little, so I can shove a flat head screwdriver under the side of the horn and push the nut back into the horn. The only nut I've ever truly stripped was definitely my fault: I didn't have the nut fully seated, it was somewhat sideways and I forced the screw into it.


I just grab a longer screw and try to catch the threads on the nut and pull it up.