PDA

View Full Version : Question Regarding MicroProcessors



Victicom
09-21-2009, 07:18 PM
Hello,

I have a question regarding the Microprocessor that may come with one of the following Cell-Phones:
1. Nokia Model: 6120, Type: NSC-3NX.
2. Nokia Model: 3390b, Type: NPB-1RB.

My question, or questions might be the following:
1. What kind of processor (Z-80, 8085, etc., ...) do these phones have? Does anyone know? If not, where could I find out?
2. Given that we are in a Robotics Forum, is it Possible to Strip-Down these phones, and use their Processor as a Micro-Controller for a Robotics Project?
3. Now, I'm pretty sure that in order to "Play" with those Chips, if Possible (Given that they were not "Hard-Wired" to work ONLY with the Cell-Phones they came with), I will need to have some Knowledge of their Respective Architecture's Assembly Language, right?

Thanks, if I can get that doubt out of the way, I'll be pretty much happier with my plans.

Adrenalynn
09-21-2009, 08:00 PM
Welcome to the forum!

The 6120 is an ARM-11.

Possible? Yes. Practical? No. Doable given the way you expressed the question? Absolutely no way.

Get yourself an Arduino, or even an ARM experimenters/prototyping board and learn MCU's the right way.

Just as a heads-up - The Z80 was "all that" when I started learning assembler... About 30 years ago. You can buy microprocessors now that would crush any Z80 and get 'em two for a dollar. Literally.

The XMOS you see advertised over to the left there is at least the equivalent of _3200_ Z80A's in processing power for < $30. With a LOT more pins and infinitely more memory. But even that isn't for the novice. The Arduino is a dream for the novice - and still 6x faster than a moderately clocked Z80A with unfathomably more support.

Victicom
09-21-2009, 10:29 PM
Welcome to the forum!
The 6120 is an ARM-11.
Possible? Yes. Practical? No. Doable given the way you expressed the question? Absolutely no way.

Yea, I mentioned a Z-80 just as an Example... not intending to say that was the Actuall Processor in the Cell-Phone.

So, let me set the record straight... your recommendation would be that it is better for me to buy an MC, since they're cheap anyways, and just play with that instead of dealing with ripping the poor thing appart and playing with its guts? Right?

That sounds fair to me. Really.

Now, the deal is that, originally, this was thought of as a Personal Project. However, now that I think of it more... I think it would be convenient to get with some members of my Assosiation for Computing Machinery (ACM) at my University, and explore all kinds of things we can do. I'm the VP of that Organization's Chapter at my University, and I think it would be a great experience for the rest of the Members.

With this said, I'll consider your recommendation, seriously, and get together with the group, do some fundraising, and start something. Ofcourse, I'll keep refferring to this site for more questions, and even to show our project as we go along... if it is possible.

Thanks again, I much appreciate your quick response.

Victor.

lnxfergy
09-21-2009, 10:37 PM
There are a number of factors here that make buying a microcontroller a better option: something like the Arduino has a free compiler whereas an ARM11 is likely running a stripped down OS that you may have to replace entirely if you can't open it up. The Arduino board you buy will be well documented, whereas you may never find a schematic for your phone. Finally, Arduino has a HUGE open source community -- doubt that exists for the phone...

Frankly, dissecting and reverse engineering a cell phone motherboard is one of those tasks where "if you have to ask, walk away"....

-Fergs

Edit: an Arduino can be had for $30, doubt that really needs much fundraising...

LinuxGuy
09-22-2009, 10:48 AM
So, let me set the record straight... your recommendation would be that it is better for me to buy an MC, since they're cheap anyways, and just play with that instead of dealing with ripping the poor thing appart and playing with its guts? Right?
For just starting out with microprocessors and robotics, consider getting a Pololu 3pi Starter Kit (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5913-3pi-Robot-Starter-Kit.aspx). I wish these had been available when I started out with robotics in 2006. The newer 3pi (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5913-3pi-Robot-Starter-Kit.aspx) robots have the Atmega328P in it, which gives you 32K flash program memory, 2K RAM, and 1K EEPROM for data storage. You can also get an Atmega328P microprocessor to put on a standard Arduino Duemilanove USB Board (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/p/arduino-duemilanove.aspx) to upgrade it. The Arduino (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/p/arduino-duemilanove.aspx) and 3pi (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5913-3pi-Robot-Starter-Kit.aspx) use the Atmel Atmega series processors, which are very popular for hobby robotics. I don't think you can go wrong learning these.

I already have an Arduino board, and am seriously considering getting a 3pi (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5913-3pi-Robot-Starter-Kit.aspx) to tinker with, maybe even two of them. There is also an upgrade path in the AXON (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/5826-Axon-Microcontroller.aspx) (uses an Atmega640) controller for more power when you are ready. I just got one and am starting to learn how to work with it now. There is something for any experience level. :happy: The RoboDuino (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/roboduino.aspx) is an Arduino that is designed to make it easy to connect sensors and servos to and use on small robots. If the RoboDuino (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/roboduino.aspx) had been available when I bought my Arduino, I would have got it instead. I also have a Sanguino I built from a kit, which is basically an Arduino with an Atmega644, that has an additional UART and more I/O than an Arduino.

You have a lot of options with the Atmel Atmega microprocessors. :happy:

8-Dale