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csdude
01-06-2010, 04:08 PM
Hi all,

I am thinking of using an old Dell power supply (PS-5201-1D) as a power supply for testing parts of the rover I am going to build. It has all these different voltages etc, could come in handy.

Does anyone know what wires to jumper to turn it on?

thanks,

Ron

jes1510
01-06-2010, 04:38 PM
On the ATX connector you want to tie the green wire to ground. You also need to have a load on the power supply. A power resistor from 5v (red wire) to ground will do the trick.

http://www.wikihow.com/Convert-a-Computer-ATX-Power-Supply-to-a-Lab-Power-Supply

csdude
01-06-2010, 04:48 PM
ok, on a dell it is the grey wire that need to be connected to ground. I did that but nothing happens. (Dell made their own it seems) I didn't know about the load. (I do know that if you don't give it a 'power good' signal in a few secs that it will quit again too.

thanks for the link !! I appreciate it

csdude
01-06-2010, 06:06 PM
On the ATX connector you want to tie the green wire to ground. You also need to have a load on the power supply. A power resistor from 5v (red wire) to ground will do the trick.

http://www.wikihow.com/Convert-a-Computer-ATX-Power-Supply-to-a-Lab-Power-Supply


Yup, that worked. The Dell 'ATX' plug is not a standard one. but if you put a load on the dell version of the ATX plug and jumper the gray wire, it will run.

again, thanks.

Ron

jes1510
01-06-2010, 11:21 PM
PC power supplies are switching supplies. A switching power supply won't regulate correctly if unloaded. Some of them won't turn on, some won't regulate right, and others catch fire.

Be sure to mount the resistor to the metal chassis. It will get quite warm otherwise.

Good luck with the project!

csdude
01-07-2010, 01:43 AM
I used a lightbulb to check if I could get it going. I read something about using a power resistor as a load. (I stopped at radio shack, their reply... "huh??"

jes1510
01-07-2010, 01:26 PM
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062291

10 Ohm, 10 Watts. Put that from 5v to ground. It'll dissipate around 2.5 Watts so it'll get pretty toasty if you don't clamp it to the chassis.

webgeek
01-07-2010, 07:58 PM
Sometimes it's called a "sandbar"-style resistor. I use a big ATX supply to power the 12v needed for my MAME cabinet speaker amplifier. It works great and is a cheap way to get a pretty good power supply.

Mike

csdude
01-08-2010, 10:59 AM
ok, cool.. thanks.

I had the power supply and wanted to see if it was still working.

I went to the local radio shack and they looked at me and said ... "you want a what now?" I went to the car parts store and got a 12W bulb that did the trick. The power supply is working and next time I am "in town" I'll stop at a real electronics store and buy the right parts to make it work.

thanks for all the tips.

Ron

zoomkat
01-08-2010, 11:47 AM
If you go to radio shack and you don't know where the electronic parts are, you need to tell them it is an electronic part/resistor and tell them the part number is 271-132. I shop my local store if I need a quick single part, but don't really expect the sales persons to know much about the individual electronic parts.

Adrenalynn
01-08-2010, 07:56 PM
ok, cool.. thanks.

I had the power supply and wanted to see if it was still working.

I went to the local radio shack and they looked at me and said ... "you want a what now?"

RadioShack: You have questions...

We have blank stares.

;)

lnxfergy
01-08-2010, 08:11 PM
RadioShack: You have questions...

We have blank stares.

;)

We discussed this already.. it's *creepy* blank stares....

-Fergs

Adrenalynn
01-08-2010, 08:13 PM
Sorry - I'm a slow learner.

csdude
01-08-2010, 09:57 PM
RadioShack: You have questions...

We have blank stares.

;)


Yeah.. *lol* someone told me he worked at a tattoo place before he started there. Every time I come he looks at me scared wondering what new word, for the thing I am going to ask, he is going to learn today.

webgeek
01-08-2010, 10:53 PM
My complaint with Radio Shack is both the blank stares and the high pressure cell phone sales pitch. NO, I DO NOT NEED A NEW PHONE!!!!! ARGH!!!!! That, and always asking for my phone number when I buy something. Oh yeah, and the high prices on electronics. And the poor selection in my local store. Actually, come to think of it, I don't like Radio Shack as much as I used to. I remember as a kid that they had lots of electronic parts and kits but these days, it's just the one bin section and creepy stares.

-Mike

Adrenalynn
01-09-2010, 12:13 AM
I always give 'em 85285 for a zip code (Tempe, Az is the US Sister City for Timbuktu), and the phone number for the mayor's office or the police department, depending upon my mood.

csdude
01-10-2010, 12:13 AM
I usually go to King's in Indianapolis for stuff. So far they have anything I need. The only fun you can have there is asking them for directions (it's an older couple that runs the place). When you ask them for directions they always start arguing *lol*

csdude
01-10-2010, 12:15 AM
My complaint with Radio Shack is both the blank stares and the high pressure cell phone sales pitch. NO, I DO NOT NEED A NEW PHONE!!!!! ARGH!!!!! That, and always asking for my phone number when I buy something. Oh yeah, and the high prices on electronics. And the poor selection in my local store. Actually, come to think of it, I don't like Radio Shack as much as I used to. I remember as a kid that they had lots of electronic parts and kits but these days, it's just the one bin section and creepy stares.

-Mike

well.. when you go there to get a battery or so they always need ask your phone number. last time that happened I asked "why, you want to go on a date with me?"

They don't do that anymore now :)

stu
02-16-2011, 01:35 PM
Sorry to revive an old thread, but it seems to still be alive and directly addresses a question that I have. Like csdude, I am converting a Dell PS-5201-1d power supply for bench use. The comments have helped me confirm that the power resistor and jumping the grey wire powered up the supply.

However, it took me a while to figure out that I needed to confirm with a DMM because the cooling fan has never come on.

The source of power for the fan is the circuit board. Can anyone tell me if it is thermostatically controlled, or constant on?

Is it 12V, 5V or other?

Any other advice? Should I just wire the fan direct to one of the voltage sources?

Another question on the same supply. It has the separate Auxiliary Power Connector: 3 Black grounds & 3 Blue/White 3.3V. Some references mention that the outside B/W 3.3V terminal is a sensing wire, but I don't see evidence of this. Does anyone know if this wire has a special/different function, such as delivering optimum voltage? If I use only one 3.3V supply line should I avoid it, use it, or twin it with another?

Thanks,
stu