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View Full Version : [Question(s)] A Good Motor Controller



ROBOTMAN
02-03-2010, 06:36 PM
I recently purchased a MD23 motor driver to control my 7.5v 4a motors. After "damaging" my first one and receiving a second one with the same problem I believe I need a new controller. Robotshop the company that sold me my first and second MD23 can't seem to find the solution to my motor controllers problem. I surfed the web for a long time looking for a motor controller with the MD23s capabilities but I have come up blank. What was great about the MD23 was it did PID speed control for me. Also it kept track of my encoder count. I now need another motor controller that can do all of this. I looked around for a long time and could not find anything. A good suggestion on the web was to use a PID devise and a PWM motor controller. Where can I find a PID devise that will work with my quadrature encoders? Or just a motor controller with PID built in? I know I can use my arduino micro controller to read the quadrature encoders and use H-bridges to do the rest but this is not the path I wish to take. Too much time would be spent with the interrupts; my code would be slow and I would be forced to compensate for delays that appear randomly.

Adrenalynn
02-04-2010, 11:59 AM
>> Too much time would be spent with the interrupts; my code would be slow and I would be forced to compensate for delays that appear randomly.

Which is identical to every other microcontroller, include that which is embedded on the MD23.

ROBOTMAN
02-04-2010, 07:10 PM
The point of the MD23 is to take the strain off the main controller and place it on a dedicated system... Are you recommending using a home made MD23 made out of a small micro controller and motor drivers? That makes more sense... I'll google it but do you have any examples of this?

zoomkat
02-04-2010, 10:16 PM
So what were you doing that resulted in "damaging" your MD23s?

ROBOTMAN
02-04-2010, 10:21 PM
No actually Robotshop shipped me an MD25 and never told me about it. I was destroying them because I would reverse the current when nothing else worked as the final test. I resolved the problem now.

jes1510
02-07-2010, 01:54 PM
.... I was destroying them because I would reverse the current when nothing else worked as the final test....

Congratulations on stumbling across what is quite possibly the worst troubleshooting method in history. Do I even need to explain why this is a really bad idea?

ROBOTMAN
02-07-2010, 02:34 PM
No I'm pretty clear on why that is a bad idea now.:) Actually I already knew what would happen but I tried it anyway. I sometimes need to learn the hard way...

Adrenalynn
02-07-2010, 10:18 PM
Congratulations on stumbling across what is quite possibly the worst troubleshooting method in history. Do I even need to explain why this is a really bad idea?

Actually, I think it's pretty effective. If you can't figure out what the problem is, just create a new problem that is impossible to repair. Voila! Now you can stop trying to figure out the original problem and just start from scratch. Rinse, lather, repeat and you can go your entire life never having to debug anything...

Alex
02-08-2010, 09:07 AM
Congratulations on stumbling across what is quite possibly the worst troubleshooting method in history. Do I even need to explain why this is a really bad idea?


You should've seen me trying to debug my very first tri-level for..loop through a 3D array in C++ back in '02 ;)