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View Full Version : [Just For Fun] Some pics of my robots



djsures
03-03-2011, 12:55 AM
Hey cats. I bought a new camera today so we were playing around with it. Just taking pics of the robots for fun. We've been asked to write an article for Make Magazine about toy hacking robotics and the ez-b so I have lots to learn about cameras in the next month! I want the shots to be on the workbench and not showcased on a set. I was hoping to keep the pics looking real.

Looks like I may need to declutter the bench though :)

I know some of u take real wicked pictures. Any tips or hints would be great!

http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0001.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0013.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0016.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0017.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0018.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0019.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0021.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0022.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0024.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0025.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0028.JPG


http://www.dj-sures.com/GraphicFiles/2011-03-02 Calgary Robot Pics/Resized_IMG_0031.JPG

djsures
03-03-2011, 05:53 PM
No? Yes? It's always so quiet when I post....

cire
03-03-2011, 07:37 PM
Nice pics, I don't think any of my pictures look at nice as yours.. I think the environment though, like lighting and what else is in the picture. All of yours look pretty professional to someone who doesn't take good pictures.

Stobs
03-03-2011, 09:18 PM
I actually took a basic photography class about 25 yrs ago - so I don't remember much! :} - but I remember one of the principals of composing a shot was to minimize any affect that didn't add to the main object of the shot.

For instance, ask yourself if you think a shadow adds or detracts from a viewer's focus on the main object - if it does great, if not consider more indirect lighting of the area. Same thing for surface glare - again, if not then consider changing the camera angle, covering the surface in some manner or removing the offending from the frame if possible.

Another aspect of composing the shot is the target audience - if you're presenting to a gathering of artist/aficionados then unconventional camera angles and/or unnatural lighting affects may well be quite desirable; if it's for a pack of engineers then straight-and-centered might be more effective.

Something else to consider is the inclusion of other objects in-frame. Selling a car that's shown with a huge oak tree in the background, or as one of a bunch of other parked cars along a street tends to district not only the viewers eyes but also their thoughts as competing objects of interest. In that same vein is a bowl of cereal (or can of beer!) on a workbench filled with gadgets and tools - the workbench/tools can certainly add to the composition of gadgets, but the bee...ceral? Sharing photo's with friends? What's a bit of corn flakes matter?! Angling for a professional presentation? Everything in-frame matters.

Also, you may want to consider using a piece of flexible card stock or similar material that would transition from a flat horizontal surface to a vertical one. This technique can help to minimize distractions by essentially presenting a uniform surface and color tone to the eye, among other uses like blue- or green-screening.

Hope that helps and good luck with the article! :D

Paul

indirect lighting by Susan Quilty (http://www.helium.com/items/967672-bounce-flash-and-other-indirect-lighting-techniques)
indirect lighting by Liane Laskoske (http://www.helium.com/items/955526-bounce-flash-and-other-indirect-lighting-techniques)
photo composition (hit "previous" for lighting) (http://photoinf.com/General/NAVY/Composition_and_Basic_shots_or_sequences.htm)

djsures
03-04-2011, 11:12 AM
I actually took a basic photography class about 25 yrs ago - so I don't remember much! :} - but I remember one of the principals of composing a shot was to minimize any affect that didn't add to the main object of the shot.

For instance, ask yourself if you think a shadow adds or detracts from a viewer's focus on the main object - if it does great, if not consider more indirect lighting of the area. Same thing for surface glare - again, if not then consider changing the camera angle, covering the surface in some manner or removing the offending from the frame if possible.

Another aspect of composing the shot is the target audience - if you're presenting to a gathering of artist/aficionados then unconventional camera angles and/or unnatural lighting affects may well be quite desirable; if it's for a pack of engineers then straight-and-centered might be more effective.

Something else to consider is the inclusion of other objects in-frame. Selling a car that's shown with a huge oak tree in the background, or as one of a bunch of other parked cars along a street tends to district not only the viewers eyes but also their thoughts as competing objects of interest. In that same vein is a bowl of cereal (or can of beer!) on a workbench filled with gadgets and tools - the workbench/tools can certainly add to the composition of gadgets, but the bee...ceral? Sharing photo's with friends? What's a bit of corn flakes matter?! Angling for a professional presentation? Everything in-frame matters.

Also, you may want to consider using a piece of flexible card stock or similar material that would transition from a flat horizontal surface to a vertical one. This technique can help to minimize distractions by essentially presenting a uniform surface and color tone to the eye, among other uses like blue- or green-screening.

Hope that helps and good luck with the article! :D

Paul

indirect lighting by Susan Quilty (http://www.helium.com/items/967672-bounce-flash-and-other-indirect-lighting-techniques)
indirect lighting by Liane Laskoske (http://www.helium.com/items/955526-bounce-flash-and-other-indirect-lighting-techniques)
photo composition (hit "previous" for lighting) (http://photoinf.com/General/NAVY/Composition_and_Basic_shots_or_sequences.htm)


That is fantastic advice! I didn't think about the background as much. I wonder if it i could blur the background so i can still maintain the "workbench" appearance that i'm going for. And that would focus the viewers eye on the robot. I have some reading and testing shots to do tonight now!

I'll pick up some card stock today too. I'll try a few shots with nothing in the background and see what transpires :)

Stobs
03-04-2011, 07:40 PM
The work bench is a nice touch, I'd just recommend something to cut down the glare. Might be as simply as drawing the blinds of the windows the glare-producing light is coming from? If not a slab of butcher block works great as a work bench surface (I like it because it's non-conductive and takes a lot of beating, including torch scorch marks), although a piece of plywood would be a thinner alternative. Lot's of different choices there, really, like simple card stock flat, a piece of laminate temporarily laid over the glass top, or even an anti-static mat used for working on electronics - short of soldering on it, just to name a few. Great pics so far and looking forward to hearing how the assignment goes for you!

Paul

djsures
03-05-2011, 01:15 PM
The work bench is a nice touch, I'd just recommend something to cut down the glare. Might be as simply as drawing the blinds of the windows the glare-producing light is coming from? If not a slab of butcher block works great as a work bench surface (I like it because it's non-conductive and takes a lot of beating, including torch scorch marks), although a piece of plywood would be a thinner alternative. Lot's of different choices there, really, like simple card stock flat, a piece of laminate temporarily laid over the glass top, or even an anti-static mat used for working on electronics - short of soldering on it, just to name a few. Great pics so far and looking forward to hearing how the assignment goes for you!

Paul

hey paul! I have another room with a wooden bench for cutting, hammering, drilling and making a mess :) ... But it is darker and colder haha. I use the glass bench for soldering and assembly. Its scratch resistant and very bright for working on. I sure see your point about the brightness though. I will go to the office supply store (staples i guess) and pick up a couple large matt sheets of bristle board. I can lay those down for pictures.

Sweet suggestions. I appreciate the feedback :D .. I'm all too excited for everything that is happening with the ez-robot project right now. big news in the upcoming days and weeks!!

oh and the project now supports iroomba through the sdk or ez-builder. don't even need to write code now to have the roomba follow colors or motion :D :D I was busy last night!

http://www.ez-robot.com/Community/uploads/roomba7.jpg

RavenW
03-05-2011, 02:11 PM
Another thing is all your shots are from above. Try to get some head on shots so they can be seen from a lower angle. Another trick would be using a white sheet for a background. I know Zenta uses that along with multiple lights and umbrellas but, you would lose the workbench look by going that far.

djsures
03-06-2011, 02:23 AM
Another thing is all your shots are from above. Try to get some head on shots so they can be seen from a lower angle. Another trick would be using a white sheet for a background. I know Zenta uses that along with multiple lights and umbrellas but, you would lose the workbench look by going that far.

A white sheet? GENIUS! I'll get on it tomorrow. Man you are all wicked. Thanks a bunch.

gonzo
03-07-2011, 07:31 PM
Hi djsures,..

That's a bunch of cute robots you got there.
Any video of them in action? I would love to watch it!;)

Regards

-gonzo-

djsures
03-08-2011, 02:17 AM
Hi djsures,..

That's a bunch of cute robots you got there.
Any video of them in action? I would love to watch it!;)

Regards

-gonzo-

Hey gonzo! I sure do have lots of videos of those robots... You can find info about them all here
http://www.ez-robot.com/Projects/Robots

And older ones here: http://www.dj-sures.com/robots

:D

djsures
03-11-2011, 05:52 PM
I picked up a white sheet today. I'm pretty excited to snap some photos tomorrow. Hopefully i'll have some to critique later this weekend :)