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View Full Version : Uptech Robotics clone of Dynamixel



pauljurczak
10-29-2011, 06:17 PM
I just stumbled upon a clone of Dynamixel (same bus and protocol with some extensions) in standard servo form factor: http://www.robotshop.com/uptech-cds-5516-serial-robot-servo-3.html. Needless to say, it costs less. Does anyone have any practical experience with these or can shed some light on their quality?

parallax
11-04-2011, 12:38 PM
I am very curious about these as well~ the data sheet also says they have higher torque than an AX12... It would be great to be able to mix the best of both worlds =)

parallax
11-08-2011, 04:42 PM
Found this on YouTube...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZBo1LViDnk
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZBo1LViDnk)

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZBo1LViDnk)

Load test of 0.5kg weight on CDS5500; distance from the center of the servo spline to the center of the weight is around 9-10cm. All running fine.


With the weight of 0.75kg, it starts to make a lot of noise but keep moving.
With the weight of 0.85kg, it intermittently stalled.


Voltage read from the servo feedback is 9.9V. Min and Max voltage is 6V and 14V as read from the control table.



Thoughts?

pauljurczak
11-08-2011, 05:28 PM
This data suggests less than manufacturer specified performance, assuming adequate power supply. Stall current for this servo is about 1.3A (from the datasheet). Voltage measurement during stall is needed to verify that the power supply used can supply adequate current.

lnxfergy
11-08-2011, 06:16 PM
This data suggests less than manufacturer specified performance, assuming adequate power supply. Stall current for this servo is about 1.3A (from the datasheet). Voltage measurement during stall is needed to verify that the power supply used can supply adequate current.

Those numbers are probably right, remember moving torque != holding torque. A moving torque equal to 1/2 the "manufacturer's holding torque" specification is actually not too bad.

-Fergs

pauljurczak
11-08-2011, 06:30 PM
Technically, they can be arbitrarily close, when acceleration is reduced to near zero.