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View Full Version : [Project] Z-363 Spectre 3D Printed Body for Bioloid Premium



CasperH
04-22-2016, 04:22 AM
Hey everyone, figured I should finally share this project with you all. It has been in development on and off for about 1,5 year now. I got the idea while working on my previous project, the Tachikoma (http://forums.trossenrobotics.com/showthread.php?5974-Tachikoma). In essence it is using an existing robotics kit and replacing the generic frame parts with extremely awesome looking bits. I was very lucky to pick up a cheap second hand Bioloid Premium and then the tinkering commenced. A quick overview with 3 images: sketch, 3D design, physical reality:

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Some specs:
- It takes 140 hours to print, at layer height 0.2 and 0.25 mm for small and large parts respectively.
- It consists of 56 separately printed parts.
- All the Bioloid Premium parts can be dropped in and connected (AX-12A, CM, battery etc).
- Some range of motion has been sacrificed for cosmetic purposes.

I'm looking in to doing something commercial with it, in combination with Open Hardware, making all the .stl and or the 3D engineering files available. Additionally I also want to improve the wiring with custom wire shielding by ordering some sleeving from moddiy.com.

Some WIP images from various stages:

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jwatte
04-22-2016, 11:55 AM
That looks awesome! The final thing looks a lot like the 3D model, too, which is a great sign :-)

Did you verify mobility ranges and wiring in the 3D model before printing?

CasperH
04-23-2016, 06:01 AM
That looks awesome!

Thank you!


The final thing looks a lot like the 3D model, too, which is a great sign :-)

I sure hope so, something would be very wrong indeed! :tongue: 3D printing has a tolerance of about -/+ 0.15 mm in the X and Y directions so that is something to keep in mind when making parts that have to fit together.


Did you verify mobility ranges

Yes, I verified them during the design using joint assemblies in 3D. However, as mentioned I did have to sacrifice some range of motion for the looks of the robot. The generic bioloid parts have more range of motion, but not all of it is really needed in my opinion.


and wiring in the 3D model before printing?

Where possible I compared with a still partly assembled Bioloid Premium model on how the wires go. The thing that proved challenging and which I am still working on is the torso area where everything comes together with the controller. For improved integration I plan on making cables to custom lenghts and running them through the 3D printed parts. This will clean up the model and will make sure no wires snag on to something during movement.

jwatte
04-23-2016, 01:07 PM
Sounds like a good approach.
What software are you using?

CasperH
04-23-2016, 03:17 PM
Since the end of the Tachikoma project I am running with Fusion 360 (http://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/overview). It's a new piece of software from Autodesk. The reason it is called Fusion is because it allows for both shape like parametric modelling and the more straight forward solid modelling. It's free for hobbyist and small businesses. Aside from the modelling features is also has integrated CAD/CAM CNC tooling and integration with 3D print utilities. For teamwork it allows project invites and it has a sort of Git like system for version control. I really like it. :rolleyes:

_ADAM_
05-04-2016, 04:38 PM
Dude that looks great. Like a Gundam.

r3n33
05-05-2016, 03:05 PM
I really like those models! I think it would be great to see some of those parts illuminated ;)

_ADAM_
06-14-2016, 10:12 AM
Any updates on this? Would be cool to see it in action.

CasperH
06-14-2016, 12:34 PM
Any updates on this? Would be cool to see it in action.

Thanks Adam.

I pretty much finished printing all the parts, but I ran out of M2 bolts during assembly. They should arrive any day now. Once I have that, it will be standing up on it's own. No movements/software routines yet though. :wink:

CasperH
06-20-2016, 03:38 PM
Annnnddd... done. For now anyway.

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jwatte
06-20-2016, 04:47 PM
Must ... have ... video!

Xevel
06-21-2016, 03:59 AM
Looks great, congrats :)

Zenta
07-08-2016, 04:47 AM
Looking good! Really nice parts, well done!

Do you use PLA filament?

CasperH
07-08-2016, 05:33 AM
Looking good! Really nice parts, well done!

Do you use PLA filament?

Thank you Zenta. :o

Everything except for two parts is printed in ABS. People kept telling me I was crazy and I definitely had some frustrating moments along the way. But it panned out. My recommendation would be to prototype with PLA first and then move on to ABS for a final part. I do have a printer (Spiderbot) with a PEI material bed, heated chamber (60 degrees) and a heated build plate (100+ degrees) so that really helps with printing in ABS.

The other two parts are a material called NGEN from a company called Colorfab (link (http://ngen.colorfabb.com/what/)). It's pretty good material but much more shiny then ABS and they didn't have all the colors I wanted. Prints easy though. See the link for a comparison data sheet with PLA and ABS.

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Some better photo's attached. This is it for now, I have already started on a new project with a robotic arm and some vision to challenge myself more from a software angle.

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tician
07-08-2016, 09:55 AM
Definitely impressive design and dedication to get it all printed, but I can't help thinking "holy crap, that is a cool peg-board tool holder in the background" and now I want to make one for my desk.

CasperH
07-08-2016, 10:32 AM
Hey Tician, thanks.

To help you along with that peg-board. Here is some background information. I have several stainless steel desks which come from a kitchen manufacturer (cheapest I could find). The pegboard itself is from plexiglass and laser cut to my specifications.

First I made a 3D Design. Actually this was just one small part of my whole study room design.

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Then I requested some quotes from manufacturers and made a set of drawings for both the glass and the stainless steel frame. I have them in .pdf if you'd like.

I added two short blue LED strips on each side and used some simple 3D printed blocks to put the wiring under while the plate rests on top, they are powered by some 9V supplies and connectors from ebay. I checked the optimal blue light setting with my lab power supply. 9V was better then 12V.

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Then I made the 3D designs for the inserts and 3D printed them. The ideas/inspiration came from Thingiverse mostly: http://www.thingiverse.com/search/page:2?q=peg+board&sa=

Some final results:

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It is not terrible sturdy if you push it hard from the side, but for basic tools it can hold everything just fine. :cool:

Let me know if you'd like the 3D designs for the peg board items. I have everything in a Fusion360 project and I can invite you to it so you can check/edit/download the files.

tician
07-08-2016, 11:08 AM
Was just going to use a big scrap of ~0.25" acrylic in the basement: mill a grid of round holes, maybe frost the surface to erase the existing scratches, bolt to some vertical tubing, and maybe add some neopixels. My desk is not too much younger than I am and is made from three round steel tubes bent into "C"-shapes then bolted together with a 24"x36" MDF main deck and a 10"x36" MDF upper deck. The upper deck is only 8" above the main deck which really limits usable space and has been visibly deformed for years, so just going to remove it and reuse its mounting holes for attaching long-term storage/display shelving with the acrylic pegboard as the front cover/door.

Zenta
07-08-2016, 03:59 PM
I second that about the coolness of your tool holder, looks awesome!

When it comes to your printed parts, do I understand it correctly that they are also the actual brackets, not only shell outside the bioloid brackets? ABS should be strong enough, but you don't have problem with flex of the material?

CasperH
07-09-2016, 12:14 PM
When it comes to your printed parts, do I understand it correctly that they are also the actual brackets, not only shell outside the bioloid brackets? ABS should be strong enough, but you don't have problem with flex of the material?

That is correct, the designed and printed parts completely replace the original bioloid brackets. The have the same function (hole placement, bearings, nuts/bolts etc), they just look a lot better doing it. :wink:

The really nice thing is that the total weight of the robot only increased 100 gram, going from ~2 Kg to ~2.1 Kg. This is mainly because the torso area on the original Bioloid contains a lot of extra unneeded material, which I do not have. The 3D printed parts can furthermore be printed hallow, saving weight. Some stress analysis was done on the more tricky parts like the knees, just to be sure it could hold it up and not break.