PDA

View Full Version : My choice of brain..



feral
01-18-2007, 07:39 PM
<p>Im kinda new to most of this, but I have some VB programming skills, so I thought I'd give it a go..</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I've gone with one of these for a brain; it arrived the other day.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><a href="http://www.norhtec.com/products/hc/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.norhtec.com/products/hc/index.html</a></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>The barebones version. They have some cheaper options, but less powerful, and less likely to run my embedded OS's at a pace I might be happy with. 98 just isnt going to cut it, and Linux is a steep learning curve.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>The board inside the case is about the size of a CD case, and at its highest, is about 3 CD cases. Its very energy efficient, and runs on 5V, worth a look for its size and price.. <img src="http://forums.trossenrobotics.com/images/smilies/robot/16x16_robot-happy.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Robot Happy" smilieid="12" class="inlineimg" /></p>
--------
vaporizer reviews (http://vaporizer.org/reviews)

srobot
01-18-2007, 09:11 PM
Hi,
I was looking at small computers about 6 months back, but never looked to seriously in to them, and did not see the site you pointed out, and today I was just thinking about them again and loged in and saw this! So thanks for pointing it out!

Thanks again,
--srobot

Dave
01-19-2007, 10:26 AM
Nifty. What OS are you going to use?

Alex
01-19-2007, 10:26 AM
Wow that is one tiny computer pulling off a lot of pros with very little cons! Keep us updated on how everything works out:D

Dave
01-19-2007, 10:36 AM
Logic Supply is another company to look into. We've been quite satisfied with their hardware. If you've got the latest issue of Robot magazine, they did an article on a wheelbot we built, which uses one of these as a brain.

http://www.logicsupply.com/product_info.php/cPath/29/products_id/670

Matt
01-19-2007, 11:29 AM
That is a nice looking mini-PC! Another tip to all the people building these systems is that you can shrink a system even further by dropping the CD-ROM. We have done systems where we just plug in an external CD-ROM via USB and disconnect it when you don't need it. Saves space, weight, and power.

Another step in reduction is moving to solid state memory instead of a hard drive. Solid Logic has a mini fanless system that can do this:
http://www.logicsupply.com/product_info.php/cPath/49/products_id/719

Alex
01-19-2007, 11:33 AM
The MicroClient Jr on NorhTec's site looks pretty slick:

http://www.norhtec.com/products/mcjr/index.html

Oh yeah... did I mention it's small:)

115 x 115 x 35 mm

asbrandsson
01-27-2007, 01:07 PM
Im kinda new to most of this, but I have some VB programming skills, so I thought I'd give it a go..

I've gone with one of these for a brain; it arrived the other day.

http://www.norhtec.com/products/hc/index.html

The barebones version. They have some cheaper options, but less powerful, and less likely to run my embedded OS's at a pace I might be happy with. 98 just isnt going to cut it, and Linux is a steep learning curve.

The board inside the case is about the size of a CD case, and at its highest, is about 3 CD cases. Its very energy efficient, and runs on 5V, worth a look for its size and price.. :)

Hello,

I would be interested in knowing how well this system operates. I am interested in picking up a mini-itx board and building a small platform around it, but it is hard to combine computing capacity and low heat and low power consuption. I have been thinking about buying a mini-itx that can handle the cor 2 duo and use a non-powered liquid cooling system.

Asbrandsson

feral
01-28-2007, 07:58 PM
<p>Hi Guys, Well havent got around to putting an OS on it yet. I'll try 2K first and see how that goes, then perhaps go to XP. It all depends on whether I can successfully get 2K really slim, yet functional!</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>The microclient JR would be great for linux.. And dosen't apparently tun 2K. Something to do with Vesa drivers..</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I've got a 2.5 IDE to CF adapter coming, with the idea to put the OS on solid state memory. It will save a few watts.. </p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I'll be running the network service and do all the logic on a remote server, communicating via Wifi.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I'll take some pics of the insides, seeing theres some interest <img src="http://forums.trossenrobotics.com/images/smilies/robot/16x16_robot-happy.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Robot Happy" smilieid="12" class="inlineimg" /> Really should document things..</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>My base trackbot, will carry about 2 kilos, and I'm searching for a cheap light high amperage battery solution @ 12v.. still looking.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I'm using a 12v / 5v 4A adapter, one of these: <font face="Arial">PP25-12-5 <a href="http://www.powerline.co.uk/pdf/pp.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.powerline.co.uk/pdf/pp.pdf</a></font></p>
<p> </p>
<p><font face="Arial">Should be enough to drive all the additional USB dongles..</font></p>
________
silversurfer reviews (http://vaporizers.net/silver-surfer-vaporizer)

Alex
01-30-2007, 09:49 AM
Nice! Keep us posted feral:D

Are you planning on using Phidgets?

I'm really excited to see how the microclient JR works out for ya!

Dave
01-30-2007, 03:48 PM
I'm searching for a cheap light high amperage battery solution @ 12v.. still looking.

Cheap, light, and high amperage? You're reaching for the stars, my friend. Picking a good battery is a bit of a balancing act. For example, we use AGM batteries in our floor rovers, because they are cheap (relatively) and have a high charge capacity for long run times. Downside: they're heavy. We use NiMH batteries in our humanoids and bipeds because the batteries are cheap and light, but the capacity could be better. Or you could go the Lithium polymer route, which gives you a very light battery with great charge capacity, but expensive (and let's not forget their incendiary tendencies)

I've got a 12V 12Ah AGM battery here that ran our mini-PC for about 4 hours (with the CPU loaded to 100%). Its size is 6” x 3.75” x 3.75” and it weighs 9.34 lbs. If your robot can handle the weight, you may want to try something similar. We don't have this battery in stock right now, but we do have its little brother (http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/p/3448-Gel-Cell-12V-7-2AH-Zeus.aspx), which is 12V 7.2Ah.

On a sidenote, I'm hoping that ultracapacitor technology (http://blog.trossenrobotics.com/index.php/2007/01/24/battery-breakthrough/) picks up soon, because it promises to blow traditional batteries out of the water.

feral
07-09-2007, 04:05 AM
Nice! Keep us posted feral:D

Are you planning on using Phidgets?

I'm really excited to see how the microclient JR works out for ya!

Of course!

Sensors / servos & relays..

As for actually getting an OS on it, not quite yet.. lol.. still building a chassis I' happy with!
________
Suzuki T350 (http://www.cyclechaos.com/wiki/Suzuki_T350)

Alex
07-09-2007, 09:32 AM
got any pics/videos of the chassis you're building?