Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Any Method to Check If A Servo Needs to Be Replaced?

  1. Any Method to Check If A Servo Needs to Be Replaced?

    Ok, I am new to robotics, and my robot is not quite taken care, so it falls a lot and sometimes over-heated.

    So my question is, how could I determine if a servo needs to be replaced? Is there a definite rule or method to check if a servo is functioning properly?

    Thanks ahead!

    Shihui

  2. #2

    Re: Any Method to Check If A Servo Needs to Be Replaced?

    If you can move it by hand, and it doesn't make horrible, scraping, clicking noises, the motor and gearbox is OK.
    If it powers on, and does what it's supposed to when you tell it to, then the control mechanics are OK.

    There is an intermediate mode for precision servos (like the MX series) where the motor is just damaged enough to cause further problems, but "seemingly works fine." For the MX series of servos, if they draw more than 100 mA while notionally idle (torque on, servo horn centered, no load,) then the motor has enough stickiness (from burning the coils/brushes) that it will start damaging itself, and possibly its neighbors on the bus, and should be replaced.

    I imagine the same state can happen for other servos; the way you measure it is by looking at idle unloaded but active current for a "fresh" servo, and if the idle unloaded active current is a lot higher (2x or more) for the measured servo, then it's probably starting to go bad.

  3. Re: Any Method to Check If A Servo Needs to Be Replaced?

    Quote Originally Posted by jwatte View Post
    If you can move it by hand, and it doesn't make horrible, scraping, clicking noises, the motor and gearbox is OK.
    If it powers on, and does what it's supposed to when you tell it to, then the control mechanics are OK.

    There is an intermediate mode for precision servos (like the MX series) where the motor is just damaged enough to cause further problems, but "seemingly works fine." For the MX series of servos, if they draw more than 100 mA while notionally idle (torque on, servo horn centered, no load,) then the motor has enough stickiness (from burning the coils/brushes) that it will start damaging itself, and possibly its neighbors on the bus, and should be replaced.

    I imagine the same state can happen for other servos; the way you measure it is by looking at idle unloaded but active current for a "fresh" servo, and if the idle unloaded active current is a lot higher (2x or more) for the measured servo, then it's probably starting to go bad.
    Thanks so much jwatte, this sounds a convenient solution, =)

    Shihui

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Question(s) rotary delta robot self calibration method
    By gfxx in forum Robotics General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-24-2016, 04:35 AM
  2. Check this out
    By Suicidal.Banana in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-18-2012, 10:27 AM
  3. Discussion Inverse kinematics with Damped Least Squares Method
    By WGhost9 in forum Software and Programming
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 06:45 AM
  4. New scoring method
    By praelian in forum Mech Warfare
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-25-2010, 02:26 PM
  5. Check out this big boy.
    By Droid Works in forum Humanoids, Walkers & Crawlers
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 06-19-2008, 12:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •